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Форум Take That & Robbie » Сольные карьеры » Green Man » Интервью с Марком 2013
Интервью с Марком 2013
PoohДата: Пятница, 10.05.2013, 22:23 | Сообщение # 1
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http://entertainment.ie/music....578.htm

How are you doing today?

I'm sat at the bottom of the garden. Its not a bad day in London...

It's often said that creativity is borne out of some event or a particular incident. Why did you choose now to pick up a guitar or pen and start writing again?

Because when we finished with the Take That record and tour there was a space. It's been awhile since I can sit and have a bit of space. I really enjoyed it and being at home around the family, not having anything planned for the foreseeable future. I got to a point where I was like 'oh what am I going to do now, for the next year, for the rest of my life?' It just naturally happened. That's where The Art of Doing Nothing came from because I realised I don't know how to do anything else. I'm so lucky that songwriting is my day to day job. You naturally go there. In some ways in your head you hear melodies. You can't turn them off. They keep coming and you have to get them out or you'll go a bit insane.

Is that where the title The Art of Doing Nothing came from?

Yes. As far as I was concerned I wasn't making a solo album, I was just making a few songs. I can't not do it. It takes more effort not to do it than do it. I'm so fortunate because I love when you get a
moment where a song gets you really excited. Believe me, not every song gets you excited though. Sometimes I used to leave the studio at the bottom of my garden at around six o'clock thinking I was the worst songwriter ever and I'd never do it again but other days you'd walk out thinking 'that was such a great day, I loved that'.

Speaking of your studio, is it creatively liberating to have that space to yourself so when you get a spark you can walk the twenty or thirty yards out there and record it?

Well, after the school run! It's not quite as random and sudden as that. First it's 'put the dishes away, clean up and then go down'.

When you sat back and listened to the fully mastered version of the album for the first time, was it representative of the sounds that you had in your head when you initially conceived it?

I go through little moments of worry but when you finally listen to it, you calm down and think 'oh its alright, it's good'. As far as the sound that's in my head, I can't take all the credit for that as I
brought in Charlie and Brad who has been working on the record. The whole album is a bit of a project. It wasn't me saying 'it has to be like this or sound like this'. I wanted it to be more open. Some of the demos I did in the studio I took a bit further than others. Actually the really nice surprise was when I didn't take it all the way to the finish line and left it open for people to come and do what they want to do and take it on their journey. They had some really lovely moments when they came back to me and said 'wow we had a really amazing time and experience on this one'.

So it's not as much a solo record as a collaborative record?

Yeah, for me The Art of Doing Nothing would be at the top, underneath that it would be the family tree and underneath that would be every one of the eight people sat around the table working on it together. That's how I see it. There was a group of people involved that helped me.

I tweeted that I was going to interview you last night and got a huge response from all corners of the globe, asking me to pass on some questions to you. Louise Muirhead wanted to know what you enjoyed most about recording The Art of Doing Nothing?

For me, the most enjoyable part was being able to do it from my own garden and having my family come in and out during it.

Allison Brown wanted to know if you miss the companionship of the Take That guys when touring solo?

Yes, it's a different feeling. When you are out with the band there are loads of other people around that have been working with you for many years so going back to Take That is always like going back to your family. When you do your own solo work it can be a little...scary.

So is it more nerve-wracking going solo, whereas Take That was more of a shared responsibility?

You definitely do feel it a bit more. You want to do well for people whereas even when you are with family and something goes wrong with whatever you are doing, you can blame someone else when there's more in the wrong. With this the finger keeps going back to me.


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PoohДата: Четверг, 23.05.2013, 22:25 | Сообщение # 2
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Mark Owen from Take That is coming to the Olympia for a solo show on June 19th. He gave 98FM a shout early this morning and told us there is no such thing a lie-in when you’re a parent!! He said “This isn’t early for me. I have three children. This is like mid-morning for me. I’ve been up quite a while. Actually being honest, my daughter Fox is sleeping through the night now so we’re very lucky. Our house is awake somewhere between 6am and 7am – 7am on a good day” he joked.

He might be an Ivor Novello award winner and a whizz in a recording studio but that doesn’t mean he can work a mobile phone. Mark kept disappearing from the end of the phone mid-interview. When he came back he said “I think it’s me. I’ve got a whole list of new options on my phone. I can merge calls, I can swap calls – it’s magical. I haven’t even spoken yet and I’ve bored half the audience. They’ve hung up on me”.

His new album “The Art of Doing Nothing” is released on June 10th – he made it when he was supposed to be taking a break from Take That. He has promised us the lads will be back next year with a new album and some big shows.

One Direction are experiencing the same kind of hysteria Take That did back in the day so did Mark find it difficult at the time with fans camped outside his house and following his every move. Mark told 98FM “It’s kinda all we knew back then but it does bring you to a different world when you see all those images. It was crazy and it does definitely bring it back to me when you see One Direction and all these new bands. It reminds me of when we were starting out with hundreds of people outside our front doors. It must’ve been strange for our neighbours”.
http://www.98fm.com/2013....rection


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MySДата: Воскресенье, 26.05.2013, 12:18 | Сообщение # 3
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I love waking without a bottle of wine inside but quitting the fags has left me a wreck – Say Mark Owen
Wildman of Take That on cleaning up his act

WITH his bandmates in Take That, Mark Owen has stood on stage in front of countless screaming fans in mega-venues such as Wembley Stadium.
The singer, from humble roots in Oldham, became one of the stars of the biggest boyband this country has ever seen — a pin-up for hordes of adoring female fans in his teens, twenties and thirties.
He even won Celebrity Big Brother when the music career had taken a back seat in 2002 — proving his popularity once again.
He is still a housewives’ favourite, now he has reached his forties, and is a happily married father-of-three
Sober for three years after beating his booze demons, he has also cracked his nicotine addiction, making him a non-smoker for the first time in adulthood.
So it might sound strange to hear he is biting his nails with fear about embarking on a solo career again.
But then he explained: “I stopped smoking on my 41st birthday, in January, and I’ve been an emotional wreck ever since.
“I’ve been a little bit on the edge, it’s been four months. Chocolate has taken over from that.
“I can’t say I’ve had any benefits yet but the drinking, definitely massive benefits — waking up in the morning and not carrying a bottle of wine inside you. It’s been three years — I’m glad I stopped.”
In his first big interview for his new album, The Art Of Doing Nothing, Mark told The Sun about coping with the stresses of solo stardom without the twin crutches of booze and fags.
He said: “This is all very exciting for me, then suddenly I get massively nervous about it all.
“I suppose that’s normal. Without wanting to sound mad, it’s the voices in my head saying, ‘It’s rubbish. It’s not going to happen. Here we go — I hope you’re ready... ’ I still get that a lot.”
Mark is being modest, of course. The new album is really impressive. It’s also impressive that he managed to juggle writing the songs with his domestic dad duties — he and wife Emma have their hands full looking after kids Elwood, six, Willow, four, and ten-month-old Fox India.
Mark set to work on the album — which filled the gap after Take That finished their record-breaking Progress tour in 2011 — in his studio, The Rabbit Hutch, at the bottom of his garden in south west London.
But the recording sessions were not without interruption. The children often popped in — though not necessarily to hear the music.
Mark said: “The kids were at school, so I worked during the day, but it was really going on in the evenings.
“Sometimes they’d come down and listen to it for five minutes, then get bored. What they tend to do more than anything is raid the fridge in the studio for my chocolate. That’s the game — they come in, steal Dad’s chocolate, wave it at me, then run off.”
But that’s not to say the children aren’t interested in music — just not their dad’s efforts...
Mark joked: “My stuff isn’t on the stereo at home. The kids love music — they’ll put it on in the morning and start dancing around, so I’m getting quite up on One Direction and Ellie Goulding. She’s brilliant, I like her. Florence + The Machine too.”
For his own album — his fourth solo release — Mark has pulled in some seriously credible people to work with — Charlie Russell, who produced Mercury Prize winners Alt-J, George Michael, Kylie Minogue and Madonna, and Brad Spence who has worked with Coldplay, Radiohead and the Stereophonics.
Recalling the factors which drove him to make the recording, he said: “When we finished Progress and came back off tour it was weird — the silence was deafening.
“It had been amazing having Rob back, to get to that point where he was back in the band and exactly like it was when we all started, then for it all to go so well. It was brilliant.
“For so much of my life I was hoping it would happen and then it did — we went on tour, then it finished.
“I remember being back at home, thinking, ‘What now? I don’t know what to do’. It’s not a crash, but there’s a massive space in your life.
“Gaz was off doing The X Factor, which was great, Rob has a new album and he had a baby. Howard’s doing Germany’s Got To Dance.
“He’s a judge, speaking in German. He never speaks in his own language, so seeing him on there was weird!
“So I realised I had to get off my ar*e and do something.
“Initially I was thinking about doing animation and going down that road, but I’ve realised I don’t need to go straight to animation — maybe in ten years.
“This record just seems like the start of something really.
“The nicest thing has been getting a lot of creative people involved. Because I don’t go out any more and drink, it’s just a way to bring people round and still have that sociable feeling.
“If I’m being really selfish about the whole thing it’s about having company. They tell me all their stories of the week — it’s a little bit like visiting your gran!”
Mark’s bandmates have already given their verdict on the finished product, which comes out on June 10, as well as new single, Stars.
He said: “They’ve all heard it — the response has been good, they’ve all been very kind. There’s many layers to doing something like this, you kind of discover more about yourself and what you can and can’t do.
“When you’re in a band with other people you become more confident.
“You’re standing there, looking at each other — it’s like playing football, and you’re like, ‘Yeah, we can do this’.
“Then, when you’ve not got that, you feel very alone, like, ‘Where’s my gang?’
“You miss them but it’s good for me, I think. Sometimes to do stuff on your own is really important.
“I need to make new memories, something separate from Take That.
“I’m hoping this is a bit of a plate-cleaner in some ways, then we’ll attempt to get back together and Take That will attempt to do something again.
“Hopefully it will be next year — but next year might come and they might go, ‘You know what, I’m not ready’. You’ve just got to give people the time.
“I’ve loved doing all this, but I love doing Take That as well.
“I’m very fortunate in many ways because my favourite thing is writing songs — and I’m very lucky that my job is something I love.”

Read more: http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol....Nuth9lE




Сообщение отредактировал MyS - Воскресенье, 26.05.2013, 12:18
 
PoohДата: Среда, 29.05.2013, 15:00 | Сообщение # 4
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Марки ещё рассказывает про альбом
http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/music....en.html


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PoohДата: Четверг, 30.05.2013, 13:33 | Сообщение # 5
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After fronting one of Take That's most popular modern hits 'Shine', Mark Owen is using the manband's temporary hiatus to return to his solo career.

Having teamed up with Alt-J producer Charlie Russell, the singer's new collection is like nothing we've heard from him before - complete with dashes of indie guitar and thought-provoking imagery.

Digital Spy called up Mark to have a chat about his new album The Art of Doing Nothing, and we couldn't resist asking about Take That's next album too.

Hi Mark! How are you today?
"I'm good. I'm over in south west London in a rehearsal room and the heater is on. It's nearly June, but it feels like November. I'm just rehearsing with the band. The worst thing is, I can hear that they've just stopped playing and are having a tea break. They're skiving!"

"Do you like it?"

Yes we do and it seems to have received a positive reaction from what we've seen online.
"Yeah it does seem to be very positive. I'm a bit in that world at the moment where I'm like, don't get happy if people like it, and don't get sad if they don't. I'm trying to walk the line down the middle. A few people came up to me when I was doing the school run going, 'Oh I really like your new song'. So it's nice when you get a reaction like that."

The video is awesome. Where did the concept come from?
"Obviously the title of the song led me to the spacesuit. My first dream while I was growing up was to be an astronaut, so part of me hoped that one day I'd have the opportunity to be that. The budget wouldn't quite stretch to me going up to space in real life, so I got to walk around Berlin."

We were listening to some of the tracks on your new album and one track in particular, 'Carnival', sounds like something a new indie band would record.
"Does it? That's not a bad thing to have said, I don't think. I'm really pleased with the record and the sound of it. When I have those little moments - and I do, now and then, say, 'why am I doing this?' - I listen to the album and go, 'that's what I'm doing!' I'm really proud of it as a record. 'Carnival' is sounding great in rehearsals and that's what is keeping me going."

You've approached the new album as a collaboration with other creatives, rather than a solo project. Why did you decide to do that?
"It just doesn't feel as lonely. I've really enjoyed the past few years with Take That - it's been really enjoyable - but going solo feels quite isolating. I didn't want it to feel like that. I wanted it to be a real group effort and I think that feels more comfortable for me at where I am in my life now. I didn't want to close the doors. Sometimes in the past when I've done stuff, it's been in closed rooms, but I wanted this whole thing to feel open."

How autobiographical are you when writing songs in the studio?
"I think it's a bit of everything really. I find it easier sometimes to express myself in song than I do in the normal world. People always say, 'well what is that song about?' and I'll be like, 'well, there's a little bit of that in there and a little bit of that'. You mix them all together and the song becomes a pot of all different things."

Were there any tracks you were working on that you thought might make a better Take That song?
"Now I can't do that. I don't know if it's a good thing or a bad thing. People say to me, 'oh you've got loads of songs left over from back then,' and I'm like, 'I can't use them'. I can't save songs because it's always ongoing really. I don't really go back to them."

You're going on a tour with The Art of Doing Nothing - are you excited or nervous about playing smaller venues after Take That's massive stadium shows?
"I have no idea! I'm excited and nervous and everything in between. I'm looking forward to getting up and playing the songs live. When you're doing the big Take That shows, creatively you can go a bit crazy - 'oh we want an elephant and a 60-foot bloke'. A lot of these venues I'm playing you can't put much in there. You can dress it up a bit, but I definitely won't fit a 60-foot bloke in there. So it's going to be a new adventure really, which I'm massively looking forward to."

You may not be able to have giant blokes or elephants, but you can put on the astronaut costume.
"The suit might make an appearance. Who knows? I did think about that, but it might be a little bit hot on stage!"

We know you've previously said that Take That won't be working on new music until next year, but have you had any discussions about where you'd like the band to go next?
"We've had a few talks, but very loose at the moment. I think depending on where we record the album is a big indication of what it will be. I have found as a band, that the location we choose is always quite important. It felt like New York and LA were the right places to record Progress, and The Circus was definitely Notting Hill. So where we're going to do it is almost just as important really."

So if we see you all on holiday in Jamaica we can expect a reggae album?
"Exactly! There might be clues. If we're all in Jamaica, there you go. That would be great, wouldn't it? I don't think I'd be able to convince them to go to Jamaica though."

Read more: http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/music....lbre1EA


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PoohДата: Пятница, 31.05.2013, 12:31 | Сообщение # 6
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Интервью с Марком на немецком
http://www.magistrix.de/news....sterben


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PoohДата: Понедельник, 03.06.2013, 00:15 | Сообщение # 7
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Немецкое интервью с Марком
http://www.berliner-zeitung.de/berlin....12.html


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PoohДата: Понедельник, 03.06.2013, 13:25 | Сообщение # 8
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Mark Owen struggled with solo identity

Mark Owen found it difficult to discover identity after from Take That.

The hugely successful boy band have shared a closer bond since their reunion in 2006 and the singer admitted it can tough adjusting to life outside the ''familiar'' close-knit group.

He said: ''Being able to sit in a room together and talk and laugh is our reward. And it's familiar - you know what it is, which sometimes means that you can come out of that room and go, 'Oh my God, what am I doing now?'

''I can only speak for myself, but I think that half the time, trying to work out who you are when you're not in that situation is the difficult part. I've spent more of my life in that band than not.''

The 41-year-old star revealed his band mates have heard his new solo album 'The Art of Doing Nothing' - and they've been ''enthusiastic'' enough to help him realising he can ''stand on'' his own.

He told The Sunday Times newspaper's Culture magazine: ''They've been really positive and enthusiastic about the album. When you get that, you go, 'Oh, the lads like it - that's OK then'.

''I really do have to remember that I can stand on my own, and puff my chest out. I do get panicky sometimes, but then I'll listen to the record and think, 'Phew, it's actually all right'.

''We joke about it, but the album is a little bit like a self-help exercise. I remind myself to listen to what I'm saying on the album, and that makes me feel better about it.''

http://www.contactmusic.com/news....3700360


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PoohДата: Четверг, 06.06.2013, 23:49 | Сообщение # 9
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http://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.uk/leisure....twitter

It’s a busy time to be Mark Owen. His new solo album is out on Monday and he’s embarking on a solo UK tour which comes to Manchester later this month. Sammi Wild spoke to one fifth of Take That.

Your fourth studio album The Art of Doing Nothing is out on Monday, eight years after your last solo album. How do you feel about the release?

I’m feeling quite good at the moment. I’m feeling really positive. I’m really pleased with the record. I’m looking forward to people hearing it. I’ve had it in my world for a while now, so I’m looking forward to some people having it in their world.

How does it compare and differ to your past albums?

Finding the right sound for the record was a bit of a journey, to be honest. The last record I did with Take That — Progress — was such a distinct sound that I was really proud of but I had to almost go back in some ways to 2005 and kind of have a little look at where I’d left with How The Mighty Fall, and the sound that was there.


Has the album turned out the way you expected it to?

I never went into it with too many expectations to be honest. I like to see things kind of grow. There wasn’t really any massive expectation at the beginning as to what it could be. At one point I was looking at bits of animation and stuff like that and going down different roads. But I tried not to have too many expectations.

You’re off on tour at the weekend. Are you excited to be going out by yourself again?

Well, we’re in rehearsals at the moment and I’m trying to get an atmosphere. What I’m hoping to be able to capture really, is a really great atmosphere. Obviously, when you do the Take That shows, there’s 60ft robotic men, and things like that with you, which I can’t fit into a lot of the venues I’m playing, so I can’t bring that with me.

The word that they normally use, that I see written, is an “intimate” vibe. But that word, just makes me feel like “I sound about 70”. I mean, I’m going to be closer to the audience so I guess it is more intimate.

But if we can get a great atmosphere and the songs sound great, and they can get into the mood of the show and enjoy it — I guess you want them to go home and go “Oh that was worth buying a ticket to”.

I don’t think about this show any differently than I think about a Take That show. Gotta give value for money, gotta give them songs they want to hear. You want to really engage. You know what’s a good word? Intimate. No, you want to engage your audience, and I want to see them and for them to come on the journey with us really. And I hope we can do that.

And song-wise I’m playing stuff off the new record, some of the old stuff as well and some Take That songs in there. So a mixed bag, and getting that to work well together. I don’t know what they can expect really.

Has the second chapter of Take That inspired the album at all?

I love the band and I love being a part of Take That, but I kind of hear them you know, when I’m going “I’m just gonna see how things naturally evolve” and you start doing that thing in the back of your mind and you hear Rob going “I wouldn’t do that” and Howard is going “No, I wouldn’t do that either, Rob”, and I’m like “Will you guys just shut up for two minutes while I just try and do something on me own!”.

It’s a nice thing, I guess that in a way, it’s inspiration even when they’re not actually in the room ’cause you know, I’ve known them for 20 years-plus. They’re a part of what I do anyway.

Has it been nice to be able to experiment on your own a little bit and take the driving seat again?

For the last few years I’ve been doing, I guess, a record every couple of years — counting Take That. And I kind of walk this path where I just try and write songs. I don’t really know what else to do really so I try and write songs and carry on doing that kind of thing. In the nicest way, it’s like they kind of all went off on holiday. Like Gaz has gone and done the X Factor, Rob’s done his record, Jay’s gone over there and Howard’s gone that way and I feel like I have to walk the same path really in many ways. I’m hoping they’ll come back next year and get back in the car. But I’m kind of just driving the bus around you know. I need to go and pick them all up soon.


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PoohДата: Пятница, 07.06.2013, 14:45 | Сообщение # 10
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http://www.coventrytelegraph.net/whats-o....4187388

Your fourth studio album The Art of Doing Nothing is out on June 10, how do you feel about the release? It’s been eight years since your last solo album, are you excited?

I’m feeling quite good at the moment, I’m feeling really positive. I’m really pleased with the record, I’m looking forward to people hearing it.

I’ve had it in my world for a while now, so I’m looking forward to some other people having it in their world.

How does it compare and differ to your past albums. I know you’ve said it was more of a “project” than an album, but does it feel like it’s a natural progression in the change of sound from what you’ve done previously?

Finding the right sound for the record was a bit of a journey to be honest.

The last record I did with Take That – Progress with Stuart Price – was such a distinct sound that I was really, really proud of and loved and I loved Stuart’s sound on the record.

Initially I went quite electronic with the whole sound of the record, which was great and I enjoyed that. But I just felt like I wanted to have a band around me to be a part of the sound as well, so we were just trying to get the right blend.

So it’s your first solo album since Take That reunited, has the second chapter of the band inspired the album at all?

I love the band, and I love being a part of Take That, but I kind of hear them when I’m going, ‘I’m just gonna see how things naturally evolve’.

You start doing that thing in the back of your mind and you hear Rob saying, ‘I wouldn’t do that’ and Howard is saying ‘No I wouldn’t do that either, Rob’.

I’m like, ‘Will you guys just shut up for two minutes while I just try and do something on me own!’.

And then Gaz says, ‘Oh, he’s getting grumpy now he just wants to do it on his own’ – so I kind of hear their voices.

And when I’m doing something I might say, ‘What would Jay say there?’ and it’s a nice thing. I guess that in a way it’s inspiration and a part of it, even when they’re not actually in the room, because I’ve known them for 20 years plus. They’re a part of what I do anyway.

Are you excited about your tour and what can fans expect from the show?

Well we’re in rehearsals at the moment, and I’m trying to get an atmosphere. That’s what I’m hoping to be able to capture, a really great atmosphere.

Obviously when you do the Take That shows, there’s 60ft robotic men, and things like that with you, which I can’t fit into a lot of the venues I’m playing, so I can’t bring that with me.

The word that they normally use, that I see written, is an ‘intimate’ vibe. But that word just makes me feel like ‘Oh God. I sound about 70’.

I’m going to be closer to the audience so I guess it is more intimate. But if we can get a great atmosphere and the songs sound great and they can get into the mood of the show and enjoy it – I guess you want them to go home and say, ‘That was worth buying a ticket to’.

Song-wise I’m playing stuff off the new record, some of the old stuff as well and some Take That songs in there.

In the video for Stars you’re dressed as a spaceman, what inspired that?

I have absolutely no idea. The lyric behind the song is that’s kind of where we all come from I guess – up there in space somewhere.

That’s my belief, somewhere a long, long time ago. Apparently we all come from nothing, from space. Somebody told me anyway, I believed it and I wrote a song about it.

I couldn’t go to space cause it was a bit expensive, so I just went to Berlin. When I was young, I wanted to be a spaceman.

Is there anything new you’re listening to at the moment?

I’m a big fan of Phoenix, I like them a lot. I like the new Atoms For Peace record.

I like Ellie Goulding, and I love Florence and The Machine but I think everyone’s probably already listened to them. I’m a bit out of date, am I showing my age here?

* Mark Owen plays The Institute, Birmingham, on June 14.


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PoohДата: Суббота, 08.06.2013, 17:36 | Сообщение # 11
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Mark Owen visited Magic studio and spoke about his desire to go into space, Take That and Elvis.

"I'd love to go to space but I couldn't justify that money, but they'll do competitions, they'll be everywhere those competitions and I'm going to enter!"

On the future of Take That he added "When we finished the Progress tour we all met up after we finished the last gig and everybody left that room going 'We've got to do this again, we've had such a great time' and I think that's still the mentality behind it all. Everybody's still up for doing more."

On growing up "I grew up listening to Elvis, I used to use butter out of the fridge to make my hair like his. At school I used to get you on stage and sing elvis songs, I could do the leg shake and the lip!"

On hist first trip to Glastonbury "On my first ever trip to Glastonbury I went to watch R.E.M. and I'd bought this new camera with a zoom. I got in the pit, Michael Stipe is on stage and they'd been told no pictures. I pull out my new camera and 2 security guards came and literally picked me up, and I got thrown out!"
http://music-news.com/shownew....twitter


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PoohДата: Воскресенье, 09.06.2013, 11:39 | Сообщение # 12
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Mark Owen is set to release his first solo album since Take That reunited. The singer songwriter’s fourth release, The Art of Doing Nothing, is out on Monday. Ahead of his gig at Manchester Ritz on June 17, SAMMI WILD, spoke to him about creating his solo work

Sammi: It’s been eight years since your last solo album, are you excited?

Mark: I’m feeling quite good at the moment, I’m feeling really positive. I’m really pleased with the record, I’m looking forward to people hearing it. I’ve had it my world for a while now, so I’m looking forward to some people having it in their world.

S: How does it compare and differ to your past albums – I know you’ve said it was more of a “project” than an album, but does it feel like it’s a natural progression in the change of sound from what you’ve done previously?

M: Finding the right sound for the record was a bit of a journey to be honest. Initially I went quite electronic with the whole sound of the record, which was great and I enjoyed that, but I just felt like I wanted to have a band around me to be a part of the sound as well, so we were just trying to get the right blend.

And then also taking into account as to where I am in my life now, and wanting it to feel authentic to where I left it.

So to get the right balance took a little bit of time. It was a bit of a journey but I’m really, really pleased with where we’ve ended up.

S: Has it been nice to be able to experiment on your own a little bit? After so many years since your last album, has it been nice to take the driving seat again?

M: Do you know what, I haven’t really thought that much about it. For the last few years I’ve been doing a record every couple of years – counting Take That. And I kind of walk this path where I just try and write songs. I don’t really know what else to do really so I try and write songs and carry on doing that kind of thing. In the nicest way, it’s like they kind of all went off on holiday. Like Gaz has gone and done the X Factor, Rob’s done his record, Jason’s gone over there and Howard’s gone that way and I feel like I have to walk the same path really in many ways, I’m hoping they’ll come back next year and get back in the car. But I’m kind of just driving the bus around you know, I need to go and pick them all up soon.

S: Tell me a little bit about the collaborations on the album, the Ren Harvieu and Jake Emlyn tracks – what was it like working with them because they’re quite unique artists aren’t they?

M: They’re really, really special artists. Ren has this stunning voice, and she’s got an aura about her as well. Incredible artist, I loved her record Through The Night which I heard for the first time about 18 months ago. Great record. To be honest she came to the studio for the day and it was probably one of the highlights of my career singing with her on the record cause she was just so natural. And do you know when you write a song and it just comes out 100 times better cause someone else sings it. She kinda did that. I liked it, but when she sang it I loved it. Which is really nice. She brought an amazing energy on the day, she only came in for a day but she brought amazing energy with her.

And then Jake, is just you know, he’s very powerful, a very powerful man. He came in and added, you know he obviously did all the rapping and added melody and stuff to the song.

S: Are you excited to be going out on tour by yourself again? What can fans expect from the show?

M: I don’t think about this show any differently than I think about a Take That show. Gotta give value for money, gotta give them songs they want to hear, you want to really engage. You know what’s a good word? Intimate. No, you want to engage your audience, and I want to see them and for them to come on the journey with us really. And I hope we can do that. And song wise I’m playing stuff off the new record, some of the old stuff as well and some Take That songs in there. So a mixed bag, and getting that to work well together.

Read more: Examiner http://www.examiner.co.uk/leisure....hcMaDdp


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PoohДата: Воскресенье, 09.06.2013, 23:39 | Сообщение # 13
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He’s part of one of the biggest bands in the world and he’s now venturing out on his own for the fourth time.
Mark Owen’s new solo album ‘The Art of Doing Nothing’ will be released here on the 10th of June.

The Take That star is also set to perform hits from his new album at The Olympia Theatre this month.
We caught up with the Take That star and asked him about his new record, touring and reality TV….

Mark can you tell us how does ‘The Art of Doing Nothing’ compares to your previous releases as a solo artist?

Well I think it’s my best record! I’ve been doing this for 20 years now with Take That and my own stuff as well so I think it will hopefully be a continuation of the journey I started 20 years ago. I’m really pleased with the songs and the sound of the record. I’m really proud of it, I guess that’s all you can be.

Out of all the songs on your new album which would be your favourite and why?

I can’t choose a favourite, they’re all beautiful in their own way

Are you confident it will do well?

I’m never confident about anything really. The hardest thing in life is setting out to do something and finishing it, I’m delighted with it and I’ve had positive feedback so far.

Tell me a bit about your new single ‘Stars’. The video sees you walking around dressed as an astronaut, where did the idea come from?

Well I wanted to go to Space but the budget wouldn’t go that far so we decided to try something different and so I got dropped off in Berlin!

You’re a member of one of the most successful groups in the world how does that feel?

I’m very proud of what Take That’s achieved. The second time the band came round it was a whole new group. Everyone was involved in writing and we were all in our thirties so it was different. I don’t sit there and say I’m in one of the best bands in the world though, I just wake up in the morning and try get through my business and get through the day really

Which Take That member would you say you get on best with?

I couldn’t choose one! They’re all my babies, it would only cause unrest among the ranks

What was it that made Take That want to get back together in 1996?

It just felt right at the time, we only intended on getting back together for the week, we didn’t know we’d be together for 7 or 8 years after that!

What was the rivalry like between Take That and Boyzone?

Well I didn’t see much rivalry. I think we were a different kind of group really. I do like the Boyzone boys and Westlife boys very much though

Which do you prefer, performing solo or as part of a group?

I think I’ve realised I quite enjoy performing and I love writing songs that people like to sing. I’m just a happy customer, happy to be part of this world and I’m trying to do my best within that really. Whether I’m on my own or with the band I try to do my best, again I can’t really compare it

What do you think of reality TV shows such as the X Factor?

I think they give opportunities to people that weren’t there in the past. Unfortunately with those shows they move very fast so they can be quite difficult. There have been people who have managed to stay on like Will Young and then you see bands like One Direction. I think its luck of the draw really, some people do really well and some people find it very difficult. They can’t be a bad thing. It’s on the telly in my house on Saturday nights. I also watch The Voice. It’s nice to see people do well and share their journey

Are you looking forward to playing in Dublin?

Yes, I’m very much looking to coming to Dublin and playing live!

Last but not least Mark what’s next on the cards for you?

For me now it’s just playing these shows and a few festivals and maybe doing more later in the year. I think next year Take That may be back in studio working on a new record, but the goal is just to take it one day at a time.

Mark Owen plays The Olympia on Wednesday the 19th of June. His new album ‘The Art of Doing Nothing’s set to be released on the 10th of June.
http://tnt24.ie/index.php/2013/06/tnt24-meets-mark-owen/15822/


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PoohДата: Понедельник, 10.06.2013, 00:57 | Сообщение # 14
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He’s performed in the world’s biggest stadiums, sold 50 million records as a member of Take That and been the recipient of screaming adulation for more than 20 years. But something is still gnawing away at Mark Owen. “I won Best Bum,” he recalls. “But I had to learn whether there was anything more to me than having a good bum. I still don’t know whether there is really.”

With Take That on hiatus, the Oldham-born star has poured his insecurities into a new solo album, The Art of Doing Nothing, released today. Its shuffling beats, inspired by indie band Alt-J, and introspective lyrics may surprise the group’s vast fan-base. But recording the album, Owen’s fourth during an intermittent solo career, provided a boost to his self-confidence. “The more I talk, the more I could probably un-sell this record,” he suggests. Working with Alt-J’s producers, the record was conceived in the Rabbit Hutch, Owen’s studio at the bottom of his Wandsworth garden, after Take That, reunited with Robbie Williams, completed the record-breaking Progress tour.

Take That’s evolution from boyband to “manband”, grossing £115million from their recent concerts, coincided with the revelation that Owen needed to change his own lifestyle. The father-of-three, outwardly the band’s clean-cut pin-up, who regularly topped pop’s “most fanciable male” polls, admitted a series of affairs to his wife, Emma, and gave up alcohol, which he admits had become a crutch.

“When you start writing songs again, you don’t know if you can because you’re used to writing with a drink because you get confidence from a drink,” Owen, 41, admits. “This record was written in a clear head-space. It was nice to know you could still write a song and actually it wasn’t the drink that was helping you write.”

Did the Take That members retreat into sex, drugs and alcohol clichés as a reaction against their sanitised “boyband” public image? “Everyone deals with it in different ways,” Owen says. “Some people have heads that find it more difficult to deal with stuff. I don’t think it’s just about being in a band. It can be about Friday and Saturday nights out in your town as well.”

The Take That juggernaut broke records for the highest-grossing residency at Wembley Stadium in 2011. But could they succeed at Glastonbury festival? Owen, a Glasto veteran who has “enjoyed the festivities many times”, believes they will one day perform on the Pyramid Stage despite Radio 1 DJ Nick Grimshaw saying the group could never ascend to the status of headliners. “There’s no question we could do it and play the songs,” he says. “I wouldn’t want to upset the Glastonbury fans because I am one. One day I expect we’d probably end up being on there.

“As a band we kind of like doing our own big shows and sometimes it’s kind of like a security blanket to be honest. We could do the Sunday slot, like Kylie, but I’d like to turn up and play one of the little tents off to the side.”

Instead of headlining a sold-out Glastonbury, Owen is gearing up for a solo club tour this week, beginning at Sheffield Leadmill. At least he won’t get trapped inside a 60ft robot, a fate Owen suffered when the technical centre-piece of the spectacular Progress shows refused to release him, in a Spinal Tap-style malfunction.

“I used to pray every night ‘please work’. The robot didn’t like the rain,” Owen shudders. “We had to get a guy with a long ladder like they use to clean windows to get me down. The audience was shouting ‘jump!’ It was a giggle. The robot is in Rob’s garden now.” The club shows will be a stripped-back affair. “I asked for a laser but I don’t even have that,” he says.

Take That’s break has lasted longer than planned but Owen says he’s “starting to get little whispers that people are getting ready to go back in and do something. I feel like we haven’t even started, strangely enough. As our life experiences develop, there’s more depth in what we can do.” While Take That lie dormant, the X Factor-created One Direction have grasped their boyband template and cracked America. Having bought a keyboard with his first royalty cheque to practice songwriting, he urges One Direction to develop their own compositional skills if they want a stab at longevity.

But now far from the teeny-pop machine himself, Owen has reached a stage in his career where he needn’t disguise a yearning for old-school indie –“I loved the Stone Roses and Radiohead” – and can release an album which attempts to fuse his current taste for Animal Collective and the Maccabees with Coldplay-style sweeping choruses. He only agreed to release the new songs, which are intended to “put an arm around the listener”, after his wife’s encouragement. “I couldn’t do this without her support. She said ‘Do it, or you’ll regret it.’ Or perhaps she’d just had enough of me around the house. But I’m very excited about it coming out.”

Owen, believed to have earned £7.5m from the Progress tour, shrugs off his inclusion in a series of stories exposing alleged tax avoidance by star names. He joined Barlow and Howard Donald in a £26m tax investment scheme which was described as a tax shelter for high net-income individuals. “My wife tells me I’m the worst person with money in the world and that confirms it,” he jokes. The restless Owen is, however, considering a radical career change. He contacted a Russian animation director with a concept for creating a musical cartoon short. “Me and Mikhail Dimitriev, I’d still love to get into animation.”

Now he is preparing to put music to one side and launch a behind the camera role as a film auteur. “I’m looking at going to film school. I want to write and direct. I wanted to do that 15 years ago. In another 15 years it will be too late so I’ve kind of got to do it in these next few years if I’m going to do it. I’m going back to school.”

And he has resolved the internal debate between his musical abilities and that envied rear. “It used to matter but it doesn’t anymore. I used to go through life making my own battles which I didn’t need to fight but I thought I did. It’s all about self-discovery. But actually, I did have quite a good bum.”

Take these: quick-fire questions
Where was the last place you went for dinner?

I had sweet potato falafel in studio

What was the last book you read?

Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts

What was the last concert/theatrical production you attended?

Jerusalem (Jez Butterworth play)

What was the last sporting event you attended?

Olympics. I took my little boy. We saw Bolt, fantastic.

What was the last film you saw?

3D film Epic
http://www.independent.co.uk/news....83.html


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PoohДата: Понедельник, 10.06.2013, 18:35 | Сообщение # 15
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Take That's Mark Owen is back on track after addiction and scandal – and now he wants to help The Big Issue

Mark Owen has been through the mill in a pop career spanning more than two decades.

At 41, he has already twice reached the summit of the music ladder with Take That’s before-and-after transformation, and enjoyed both semi-success and complete failure as a solo artist. And this is without mentioning the wilderness years, the booze, the groupies, the wife, the kids or the public shame.

Today he releases what is arguably the best of his four-album solo career, The Art Of Doing Nothing, and to mark the moment Owen said that he wanted to do something for The Big Issue.

So we said, how about designing the cover and organising a load of posters of it to go up around Britain? He said yes, Take That, here you go.

As well as gifting his creative skills to The Big Issue’s cover this week, Owen also spoke candidly about the affairs and booze revelations that changed the nation’s opinion of him.

“I'm 143 in dog years”, he said. “How did all this happen?”

I needed to break some habits. From being young... you get into patternsOf his 2010 spell in rehab, he said: “I needed to break some habits. From being young... you get into patterns. Everybody does. And you could carry on for another 20 years. But they're destructive. And in all honesty not much fun. Really.

“When I went there, the variety of people just made me think, God, people, it's not easy. It's not easy being alive in this world.”

His family – wife Emma and their three kids, Elwood Jack, six, Willow Rose, five, and baby Fox India, born 2012 – withstood the infidelity scandal and Owen admits he often thought he had thrown it all away.

“Yes, you do hit those points,” he said. “I'm finding this interview quite difficult. I know it's helpful for the Big Issue readers, who might be going through difficulties, but it's not helpful for my family, to bring it back up.

“I understand. [Enormous pause] Emma is the most amazing, amazing woman. And I have absolutely no idea why she's with me. I honestly don't. She's beautiful, sexy, strong, funny.

“If anybody goes, 'Oh, you can get through stuff', if somebody gets that from me and Emma then I'm really, really grateful and I'm glad.

“But it's better to not have to. The most important thing you can learn is being aware of yourself. Being sober helps. Some people can drink and still be aware but I couldn't be and that was my problem.

“But I don't wanna ever, ever, ever, even attempt to tell anybody how to live their life. Because I have no idea. How to live. Life.”

To read the full interview with Mark Owen, grab a copy of this week’s Big Issue, on sale now in England and from tomorrow in Scotland and Wales
http://www.bigissue.com/mix....wife-me


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PoohДата: Вторник, 11.06.2013, 16:43 | Сообщение # 16
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District MTV: Hi Mark, nice to meet you (on the phone!)

Mark: Nice to meet you too (on the phone!) Where are you based?

DMTV: We're at MTV HQ, so in Camden.

M: Okay, is there still the big studios there? [at this point, we imagine Mark indulging in a little Take That-era nostalgia for their 90's MTV appearances]

DMTV: Yes, we are in the big building with the studios, it's great.

M: Brilliant. What a cool place to work. Bet that's your dream job - how lovely. Good for you!

DMTV: [grinning] Thanks Mark! Whereabouts in the world are you today?

M: I'm in a rehearsal room in South West London. We've got a gig tomorrow and we are a tad under–rehearsed; we're having a bit of a last minute panic to be honest.

DMTV: Everyone works well under pressure; you'll be fine. [Yep, that's us, giving legendary popstar Mark Owen performance advice] Let's talk about your album. Considering it's your first solo record in a while, why was it important to you to have this collaborative aspect?

M: It could be a bit of a selfish thing; it feels a bit more comfortable when there are a few of you around and you're not having to do it on your own. I think there's another side that the whole kind of solo record makes me a bit uncomfortable.

DMTV: Why uncomfortable?

M: Well it feels a bit lonely, sounds a bit lonely. People hear 'doing a solo record', and say 'oh poor thing!' A collaborative project sounds warmer; it opens more doors, whereas 'solo' feels quite isolated and closed. Anyone can get involved in this and hopefully it'll grow and become something lovely by the end of it. Getting other people involved makes it more of an adventure. There's nothing worse than setting out on a project knowing where things are going to end. Instead, this is like being in a relationship, and being in the honeymoon period forever.

DMTV: Good analogy! We like that. Just keep bringing new people in to keep it exciting and fresh…

M: Yeah exactly, just keep it like the honeymoon period.

DMTV: Nice. So about working with (the producer of alt-J's Mercury-winning debut album) Charlie Russell; I'm guessing you're a fan of their album?

M: Weirdly, Charlie is an old friend of one of my writing partners, Ben Mark. They heard my song 'Stars' and said that they wanted to have a go with it. They were amazing at getting a whole atmosphere and a sound for the record; after 'Stars' came back I looked into what else Charlie had been doing. I then went back to listen to alt-J, thinking 'Great, Charlie's definitely gonna do the record', but then after the Mercury it made me look like I had my finger really on the pulse. It really, really worked in my favour!

DMTV: That was really jammy!

M: It was an absolute fluke [laughs].

DMTV: Lastly, in the 'Stars' video, tell us: was that you in the astronaut suit, and was it fun or really embarrassing to film?

M: It is me in the suit, I promise you that! It was -2 in Berlin when we were shooting and everyone else was shivering with icicles coming off of their noses. I was so relieved I had that suit on. What surprised me most was that while I walked around wearing the suit, people on the suit barely batted an eyelid. Nobody cared. It was a bit of a dream of mine to do that and I think I enjoyed it a little bit too much.

http://www.districtmtv.co.uk/article....9


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PoohДата: Четверг, 13.06.2013, 14:24 | Сообщение # 17
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Mark Owen, 41, is part of the re-formed 1990s boyband Take That. He’s released four solo albums, with the latest, The Art Of Doing Nothing, out now.

What can people expect from the new album? Do you want short answers? Gary Barlow always tells me my answers are too long. What people can expect? What would other people say? Tell me what I’m meant to say.

Maybe give a little description of the types of songs? I work on melody. So hopefully some lovely melodies and some nice words. I don’t know. I can’t sell myself – it sounds really eggy when I try. I’m just really proud of it.

It’s been a while since your last album. Yes, eight years. I don’t see the albums I do with Take That or those I do on my own any differently. They’re all part of the same world. I don’t feel I’ve gone back to doing something – I’ve just continued making music. It’s just a continuation of the first record I made 20 years ago and I’ve been involved in eight since. With this album I haven’t got the other lads with me.

What can you do on your own you can’t do with Take That? With this one I’ve tried to work with a different world of people. Some of the collaborations are different to what we do with Take That. There are five of us so we don’t usually go outside of that – getting all five of us on the record is hard enough, we all want to sing and there isn’t much room for anyone else unless it’s Lulu. The producers are of a slightly different genre to those we work with for Take That. It gives you a chance to look at different areas. With Take That, everything is heavily scheduled because the diaries all have to be synced up – with this, we just let things grow in a more natural way. I wrote a lot of it in my studio at the bottom of the garden. It wasn’t like going off to New York and writing it in two weeks.

Were you disciplined working at home or did you watch a lot of daytime TV? The nicest thing was being able to help out at home and I wanted to spend time with the family because we’ve just had another baby. We kept it quite disciplined and I always tried to be done by 6pm and be back in the house for dinner. Then I’d go back to the studio after the children had gone to bed.

Does Take That being back together take the pressure off the solo album? I don’t know. I just feel I’ve done the best I can with these ten tracks – there’s nothing I’d change. That takes the pressure off a bit. As long as the children are happy, that’s the main thing. Being a good dad takes the pressure off. I don’t know how much of that is down to Take That being back together. It could put pressure on. It depends how you look at it. Take That are a big band and they sell a lot of records. I doubt I’ll be competing too much with that. I don’t know. Why would it take pressure off? You tell me how it could take pressure off.

You don’t have to worry about paying the bills. You’re talking about money there but is that the main aspect? The money isn’t really relevant. You can make loads of money but if someone comes along and says: ‘All your songs are s***,’ the money doesn’t matter much. You still want to write the best songs you can. That’s what I’m hoping I’ve done.

You were thinking of going into animation – in what way? When I first started on this I was looking at writing an album with an animator. I’m really into films and found a Russian animator I really loved. He does it all by hand so it would have taken him six years to animate the record, which was a bit too long for me.

What lessons has 20 years in the music industry taught you? I’m still learning. I suppose at this time what I’m really seeing is how much the world has changed in 20 years. I’ve just looked something up online on my mobile. The world’s changing really quickly. It’s incredible.

How do the technological changes affect you as a musician? When I get a melody idea I can quickly shove it on my phone. The other day I got my CD and put it in a CD player and realised it’s the first time I’ve put a CD in a CD player for two years. I’ve listened to so much stuff online. One of my mates loves vinyl and was talking about how the notes are in the vinyl and there’s physicality to it. Vinyl was dying when we first came out – so things have changed a lot. I’d forgotten about the feeling of putting a CD in and looking through a booklet. People of today’s generation might find that a strange thing to do.

Has anyone unexpected said they’re a fan of your music? A long time ago at V Festival Chris Martin came up to me singing Clementine, which I’ve always thought was quite funny. That was quite cool. He’s a very nice man.

http://metro.co.uk/2013....3838700


09-11-2003 RW in Moscow 22-07-2011 RW & TT in Hamburg 25-07-2011 RW & TT in Dusseldorf 11-08-2013 RW in Stuttgart 20-08-2013 RW in Tallinn 15-05-14 RW in Stokholm 18-05-14 RW in Helsinki
 
PoohДата: Четверг, 20.06.2013, 23:56 | Сообщение # 18
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http://www.bigissue.com/features/interviews/2581/marking-time


09-11-2003 RW in Moscow 22-07-2011 RW & TT in Hamburg 25-07-2011 RW & TT in Dusseldorf 11-08-2013 RW in Stuttgart 20-08-2013 RW in Tallinn 15-05-14 RW in Stokholm 18-05-14 RW in Helsinki
 
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